David Marquet - Intent Based Leadership: Create Leaders at Every Level

Grow Your People – Ladder of Leadership Series, Part 3 of 4

This is part 3 of 4 in our Grow Your People – Ladder of Leadership Series


Screen Shot 2015-02-16 at 10.45.07 PMWeekly Nudge
– Recognize “Tell me what to do…”; resist and if people are reluctant to tell you what they think; try perspective change. In particular, ask them to sit in your chair, then ask them what they think (What if you were me? What do you think I’d want here?).

Think – Seeing something from a different perspective raises awareness and helps teams make better decisions.

This week, we are going to try perspective change. We are going to try and get Andy to think about the issue from different a perspective.

Andy: Hey boss, we have a problem with this week’s shipment. Because of our unscheduled machine outage we don’t have time to do our inspection.

David: Well, what do you think we should do?

Andy: I don’t know. You’re the boss.

David: OK, what if you were our client here. What do you think they’d want us to do?

Andy: Well, they’d want their parts on time but they wouldn’t want to pay airfreight…and they wouldn’t want bad parts either.

David: Thanks…what if you were me? What do you think I’d want here?

Andy: I’m sure you’d want to minimize costs but also not want to spoil the relationship with this client.

David: OK Andy, you sit here and tell me what I should do.

Screen Shot 2015-02-17 at 3.55.53 PMWeekly Nudge: Recognize “Tell me what to do…”; resist and if people are reluctant to tell you what they think; try perspective change. In particular, ask them to sit in your chair, then ask them what they think (What if you were me? What do you think I’d want here?).

Next week we’ll cover the 3rd and final strategy, which we call “fast forward.”

Review last week’s strategy – Ladder of Leadership Series, Part 2

 


0 thoughts on “Grow Your People – Ladder of Leadership Series, Part 3 of 4”

  1. TK

    So I saw this and I thought it was great. I work in a grocery store and one of our biggest opportunities is “dinner time readiness” in our store. A lot of managers feel that task lists are the best way to operate. I don’t like them because I feel it is too much “tell me what to do” and stops the associate from taking ownership over their area. So I took one of our deli associates (one who is not a great performer), in an area we struggle with, the other day and told him to stand on my side of the deli counter and tell me what the customer sees and what areas need to be worked on to get us ready for the dinner hour. He did outstanding. He saw every area of opportunity that I saw, and the customer would see. So I said to him, “Great job, You know just as much as I do, get those things fixed and we are going to be in great shape for our customers.” then I came back 45 minutes later and he was standing in the department texting and not a single thing was done. I again had him walk the department and I stood in his position and said “Okay, tell me what you see.” He pointed out all the same things. I said “now you are the manager, you told an associate what to do and they didn’t do a single thing you asked, what are you going to do?” He said “I guess I would just tell you to do your job.” I love your work, and I really like how you show real world examples of how to manage, but like many who write on management, it always seems to end with a happy tale of everyone falling in line and doing great work. In the real world, that doesn’t always seem to be the case. What percentage of people do you feel wont be on board and we need to get off the ship?


    1. davidmarquet

      Hi-

      Happy to help! Life is unpredictable and not always the fairy tale we imagine. Leadership is a daily investment and we like what you did with your deli associate. People can see what is wrong but many times do not know how to fix it. The next question is, “what do you think I would do to handle x problem?” You may find out he has know clue how to fix the issue because or technical competence or organizational clarity.

      We have to remember there is a reason why people do not want to take responsibility for a task, we need to find out what it is. Is it because he is afraid he could lose his job if he does it wrong? Will he be seen as incompetent if he tells others he does not know how to do what the things he says he see’s? The conversation only begins at “tell me what you see.”

      We are not sure this guy is wanting to be thrown off the boat. Only two guys, after an extensive amount of time, asked to be transferred because we knew the Santa Fe was not where they wanted to be.

      The next time you work with this guy start with one thing he see’s and find out what he thinks he should do to fix the problem. Do not lead him to an answer, just listen. Find out what he needs to complete the task and walk him through what needs to be done if his answer is off. The goal is not to fix the person but make it easy for him to do his job. Remember, people are at different levels. We found some of the guys on the boat needed basic math and reading classes, while others needed clarity on what our goals were.

      Give him another chance and let us know how it goes.

      Rooting for you,

      TTSA Team


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